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Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? This book is a must-have for anyone who wants to have a top-notch, model-type Chinese girlfriend or marry a such a girl. And with a population of 1.

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Melissa Margaret Schneider. Potomac Books, Inc. For centuries, Chinese marriage involved matchmakers, child brides, dowries, and concubines, until the People's Republic of China was established by Mao Zedong and his Communist Party in Initially encouraging citizens to reject traditional arranged marriages and instead wed for love, the party soon spurned "the sin of putting love first," fearful that romantic love would distract good Communists from selflessly carrying out the State's agenda.

Under Mao the party established the power to approve or reject proposed marriages, dictate where couples would live, and even determine if spouses would live together. By the s and s romantic love became a counterrevolutionary act punishable by "struggle sessions" or even imprisonment.

The importance of Chinese sons, however, did not wane during Mao's thirty-year regime. As such, in a world where nobody spoke of love, 99 percent of young women still married.

The Ugly Wife Is a Treasure at Home draws the reader into the world of love in Communist China through the personal memories of those who endured the Cultural Revolution and the generations that followed.

This collection of intimate and remarkable stories gives readers a rare view of Chinese history, social customs, and Communism from the perspective of today's ordinary citizens. When Love Didnt Exist. Forbid the Early Love. Sex and Love or Marriage?

Reform and Opening Up of the Heart. Unguided Love. Timeline of Recent Chinese History. Selected Bibliography. Who Wants an Ugly Wife?

When Susan, a shy Midwesterner in love with Chinese culture, started graduate school in Hong Kong, she quickly fell for Cai, the Chinese man of her dreams. As they exchanged vows, Susan thought she'd stumbled into an exotic fairy tale, until she realized Cai—and his culture—where not what she thought. In her riveting memoir, Susan recounts her struggle to be the perfect traditional "Chinese" wife to her increasingly controlling and abusive husband. With keen insight and heart-wrenching candor, she confronts the hopes and hazards of intercultural marriage, including dismissing her own values and needs to save her relationship and protect her newborn son, Jake. But when Cai threatens to take Jake back to China for good, Susan must find the courage to stand up for herself, her son, and her future.

Matthew H. This book is a study of polyandry, wife-selling, and a variety of related practices in China during the Qing dynasty

In China, there is a name for unmarried men over China has many millions more men than women, a hangover of the country's one-child policy, which was overturned in , though its effects will last decades more. The gender imbalance is making it hard for many men to find a partner — and the gap is likely to widen. In his book, The Demographic Future, American political economist Nicholas Eberstadt cites projections that by , more than a quarter of Chinese men in their 30s will not have married. Now, with far fewer women than men, the race to find a suitable partner—and win her over before someone else does—has led some men to go to great lengths to find a wife.

Melissa Margaret Schneider. Potomac Books, Inc. For centuries, Chinese marriage involved matchmakers, child brides, dowries, and concubines, until the People's Republic of China was established by Mao Zedong and his Communist Party in Initially encouraging citizens to reject traditional arranged marriages and instead wed for love, the party soon spurned "the sin of putting love first," fearful that romantic love would distract good Communists from selflessly carrying out the State's agenda. Under Mao the party established the power to approve or reject proposed marriages, dictate where couples would live, and even determine if spouses would live together. By the s and s romantic love became a counterrevolutionary act punishable by "struggle sessions" or even imprisonment. The importance of Chinese sons, however, did not wane during Mao's thirty-year regime. As such, in a world where nobody spoke of love, 99 percent of young women still married.

Wei Li does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. China has 24 million more men than women of marriageable age , putting some bachelors in a tough spot. In rural areas of China, three decades of sex-selective abortions under the one-child policy , which ended in , have created a severe shortage of women. Divorced men across China may find themselves involuntary bachelors for a different reason: They cannot afford another wedding.

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as a spouse does not find out and the side relationship does not cause any family trouble. In the New York Times reported the distress of Chinese wives,  Melissa Margaret Schneider - - ‎History.

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